Skip to content

Dumpster #1

October 12, 2015
by

We’ve been chipping tar getting ready for the sand blast guy’s first visit on Tuesday. It is tedious work. We sit on a upturned buckets with the tool doing the hard work while our wrists and elbows get vibrated.

Chip a section, scoot the bucket over, repeat

Chip a section, scoot the bucket over, repeat

My hands were numb by the end of the day.

Mom- note the safety apparel accessories

Mom- note the safety apparel accessories.


Instead of tuckpointing, previous owners added layers of roofing tar on the parapet.

Instead of tuckpointing, previous owners added layers of roofing tar on the parapets.

This all needs to be removed before the roofing can be installed. The spray on roofing won’t stick to the tar.

We're getting the big chunks off.

We’re getting the big chunks off.


A few holes also had to be filled

A few holes also had to be filled

On Tuesday, the sand blast crew arrives to get it really cleaned up.

We took Monday off from work to do the first dumpster fill. Tom figured out that the bricks and concrete chunks from the parapet wall removal are considered ‘clean fill’. That means we pay by volume instead of weight, and it is cheaper than the landfill dumpster. We pay for the landfill dumpster by weight, so getting rid of the really heavy stuff will save us on dumpster #2. Plus, it breaks up the labor over two weekends. A needed respite.

To get the stuff off the roof, we need a chute for the small bits. That will keep the dust from coating the neighborhood.

The construction chutes are expensive even to rent, out of control to us to rationalize buying.

The construction chutes are expensive even to rent, out of control for us to rationalize buying.

The big stuff, we drop it over the side and gravity takes over from there. It is oddly satisfying to chuck stuff off the roof. And very noisy until the bottom of the dumpster is covered.

To support the chute, we need a rig on the roof. The parapet is in too bad of shape to anchor something that heavy to it. Tom did some research and designed a rig that would be used to lift the chute into place, then support the chute and made room for us to wheel our buckets of debris close to the edge of the roof. Plus, all the parts need to be small and light enough to fit through the roof hatch. Exactly Tom’s favorite kind of puzzle! Maybe after roof-season is over, he can post his sketches and thinking about the design.

We spent Saturday and Sunday on the rig and the chute construction. Here’s the rig in place:

The orange parts are from some industrial shelving Tom got at an auction. The rest are steel angles. The wood pieces holding the winch are from the 'demo house'. Those pieces will be removed once the chute is in place, leaving a space to approach the chute.

The orange parts are from some industrial shelving Tom got at an auction. The rest are steel angles. The T-shaped wood pieces are supporting the winch, from the ‘demo house’. Those pieces and the winch will be removed once the chute is in place, leaving a space to approach the chute.

Some spare concrete chunks act as ballast to hold it all in place. The winch lowers a weighted cable to Tom, stationed in the dumpster.

Tom attaches 32 gallon trash cans, with their bottom removed, a total of 17 of them, connected to chains threaded through the handles by, our favorite, zip ties. I winch them up as Tom add the next one.

Tom attaches 32 gallon trash cans, with their bottoms removed, a total of 17 of them, connected to chains threaded through the handles by, our favorite, zip ties. I winch them up as Tom adds the next one.


Here's the chute approaching the roof.

Here’s the chute approaching the roof.


The big stuff goes over the parapet, hopefully into the dumpster.

The big stuff goes over the parapet, hopefully into the dumpster.


A bit of alley clean up was required at the end.

A bit of alley clean up was required at the end.


Full

Luckily, all that brick and concrete fit into the dumpster. This was the biggest one we could get without a weight limit.


The bottom three buckets were torn up by the debris.

The bottom three buckets were torn up by the debris.


These will need to be replaced before dumpster #2

These will need to be replaced before dumpster #2

Next up- removing all the old roofing from the first re-roofing and the next area of old roofing!

5 Comments leave one →
  1. Rick Peterson permalink
    October 18, 2015 8:44 pm

    WOW, great idea Tom !!! Now, what do you do with all the trash cans ???

  2. Maurine Pruchnicki permalink
    October 17, 2015 6:15 pm

    Good girl, Sue! I’m glad you remembered to listen to Mom. Love you, Mom

  3. October 16, 2015 11:46 pm

    I think the B.A.B. is in your blood now. (both of you). You both are working so hard. Lots of “ingenious” work, Tom. I remember the creed- “measure twice, cut once”. Thanks for sharing. Mom xx

Trackbacks

  1. A Hole in Our Roof and a Whole New Roof | B. A. B.
  2. Tons | B. A. B.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: